Saturday, January 31, 2009

Teddy Bear

Teddy Bears by the dozen, some plush, some threadbare, all loved.

Licence Plate Topper


This souvenir of a visit to Miami Beach was attached to the top of your license plate. Other Forida Beach toppers available.

Friday, January 30, 2009

Chamber Pot


The chamber pot: no home complete without it! This is a Victorian transferware china pot. Until the invention and widespread use of the indoor toilet, this was the vessel of choice.

Thursday, January 29, 2009

Parrot Book Ends

Polychromed iron parrot (maybe) bookends. Circa 1930s.

Wednesday, January 28, 2009

The Classic Creel


The classic creel or fishing basket. This one dates from the 1930s and is constructed of split willow in a French Twist pattern with leather supports and straps.

Waste Not Bread Board



Bread Board and Bread Knife. We have a number of different shapes of bread and cutting boards available.

Tuesday, January 27, 2009

Pennants


This vintage Wasaga Beach pennant dates from the 1920s. We have about 300 vintage pennants sometimes called flags or banners available; most are from schools, tourist destinations or roadside attractions throughout the US and Canada.

Monday, January 26, 2009

Chimes

video

These chimes were used by Dining Car Stewards on trains to announce the dinner service. Of course, there are other applications.

Framed Motto


The framed motto was present on the wall of many Victorian Homes in both the lower and middle classes. Often religious, but not always, they nonetheless evoke the Victorian decorating ethic. We have a number of these mottos available.

Artist's Palette

This artist's palette is actually quite large ( and we believe once belonged to Urquart Wilcox 1876-1941 ). If your setting is an artist's studio we also have paint spotted ladders, cans of brushes and a lovely paint splattered easel. And a number of lay figures as well. Lay figures? Also known as those little wooden articulated models.

Brass Telescope


This is brass three-draw telescope, dating from the late 19th century. We have a number of these available, small, medium and large.

Sunday, January 25, 2009

Dunhill Unique Lighter


The Dunhill "Unique" lighter was first introduced in the 1920s. This type of lift arm lighter is suitable for periods up to the 1960s. We have a number of other Dunhill styles in inventory.

Loving Cup, Trophy


Loving cup, trophy, mark of achievement or presentation piece, it all comes down to the same thing: a nice shiny bit to stick on your mantle and say: "that old thing? It's just something that was given to me when I..."

We have a lot of trophies in stock in various sizes and shapes. If your scene calls for a trophy case filled with awards, we can do that for you.

Maple Leaf Hooked Rug


A very patriotic maple leaf theme going on in this hooked mat or rug which measure 24" x 34". Probably from the 1920s or thirties.

Saturday, January 24, 2009

Pith Helmet


The classic pith helmet, aka safari helmet, sun helmet or sola topee. This one is a little fancier, a little rarer with its quilted cover.

Garden Claw

This great looking garden claw can be used for any period throughout the 20th century

Skirt Lifter


Victorian Skirtlifters were used to, well, lift skirts or dresses. When the slide, in this example the trefoil cross, was as the bottom, the clamps would open allowing the fabric of the skirt to be pinched. A chain or cord threaded through the eye at the top of the slide, pulled the slide up, causing the clamps to close and grasp the fabric securely. The dress could then be lifted up to keep it clean from the mud or whatever filth decked the streets.

Sock Monkey


The sock monkey first started showing up in the early thirties (although I'm pretty sure there must be earlier ones) but really didn't start coming into their own until the 1950s. We've got a bag full of them. What's more fun than a bagful of sock monkeys? This one is the smallest one we have at just 5½".

Hat Stand


Art deco wire hat stand.

We have a number of hat stands available, from small wooden dresser top styles to the large brass stand you might see in a milliner's shop window.

Wiggling Hula Girl



C'mon, who doesn't love the wiggling Hula Girl dashboard ornament. A staple. We have a few different ones, including the Wiggling Hula Boy.

Watch the Birdie!




Watch the birdy! This is the birdy that early photographers used to attract the eye and focus attention. A small amount of water goes into the bottom well and air is blown from a squeeze bulb through a hose which attached to the pipe opening at the side. The blown air caused the beak and tail to articulate while the water made the whistle warble. This was a popular novelty of the day and photogs made it their own. Watch the birdy.

Magic Lantern, Lanterna Magika


A late 19th, early 20th century magic lantern. This one was intended for home use, for amusement and education. Yup, it's Victorian so we can't have amusement without education.

Bee Hive



Yep, it's a skep or beehive. A woven wicker or willow frame that's been slathered over with cow or horse poo. It's about 26" tall. Possibly European.

Seeburg table jukebox



The Seeburg 100, from the 1950s-'60s. This was found on practically every maltshop or diner table.

Spectator Shoes



Perforated wing tipped spectators, probably from the late 1920s or early '30s. The shoe trees are a little later, from the 1950s, I think.

Slapstick



We've all heard the term, this is what it looks like: a flat piece of wood with a handle, with another hinged smaller piece attached to it. As you lift it up, gravity pulls the smaller piece away; as you go to slap your victim, the smaller slaps back down against the larger, giving the sound of a slap and the impression that your victim is being beaten. A laff riot.

This one is made by Ludwig, the drum folks; they still make them.